Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
According to RT America's broadcast, about half of all American marriages end in divorce with kids caught in the middle. But just how fair are the courts when it comes to custody battles? Holland discusses this with Dr. Ned Holstein, the founder and chairman of the National Parents Organization.

The full broadcast can be viewed here with Holstein appearing at the 14-minute mark.

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
More than one in four fathers in the United States who have children 18 or younger now lives apart from their children, according to Pew. 

A movement is growing toward shared parenting or at least collegial “co-parenting” that recognizes the importance of having two parents in children's lives. And in states like Virginia and Kentucky, legislation was recently passed to encourage joint custody.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Host Kristi Slaughter interviews National Parents Organization of Virginia's Christian Paasch on the shared parenting bill that will become law in Virginia.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Bretta Z. Lewis has seen her share of custody cases in 18 years as a family law attorney.

Some of her clients think the courts favor mothers over fathers. Some mothers think their chances of getting custody are slim because they don’t make enough money.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Further, Kentucky politicians’ pride for being the only shared parenting state probably will be very short-lived. Many states are considering strengthening their joint custody laws. In fact, Alabama and Iowa’s Senates have both already passed this year stronger shared parenting bills than Kentucky’s landmark law. Kentucky’s law excludes parents who are found unfit based on a “preponderance of evidence.” In other words, the court will not award a parent joint custody if it believes there is a 51 percent or greater chance the parent is unfit. The Alabama and Iowa (and soon many others I’m sure) bills award shared parenting unless the court believes the parent is unfit based on “clear and convincing evidence,” which is much higher.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn