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kplcFathers & Families Executive Director Glenn Sacks was interviewed by NBC Louisiana affiliate KPLC on the subject of male victims of domestic violence on June 8. To watch the report, click here. To read KPLC's Brandon Richards' news article, see Men are victims of domestic violence too (6/8/10). According to the report::
men-are-victims-of-domestic-violence-tooWhen police respond to a domestic dispute between a man and a woman, chances are the woman is the victim. But that's not always the case. "Research shows that about a third of all domestic violence injuries are sustained by men, so it is a significant problem," says Fathers & Families Executive Director Glenn Sacks. "The research has been clear on this for 35 years, that women are at least as likely and to some degree more likely, to initiate domestic violence than men are." Sacks said the legal system is no help to abused men either. He said men who experience abuse are not likely to report it because they fear they will be perceived as the abuser by police and arrested. He also said abused men who are fathers don't want to risk losing or leaving their kids with an abusive mother. "Let's say you're a father, you're married, have two kids and your wife is abusing you," explains Sacks. "Well, if you take off and leave then you're leaving your kids in the sole custody of an abusive, violent woman." Sacks said the problems are only going to grow worse for men until victims speak out and demand change, much like women's groups have done in recent decades. "There has to be a real public consciousness that domestic violence against men is a real issue," said Sacks.
To learn more about domestic violence, see Glenn's co-authored column No One Believed Me (MSN.com, (8/1/09).

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October 18,2010

Donald Hubin, Ph.D., Chairman of Fathers and Families of Ohio's Executive Committee, appeared on the Scott Sloan Show on WLW AM 700 in Cincinnati today. He discussed SB 292, a new Ohio bill that will raise child support amounts in the middle of the worst economy since the Great Depression. To listen to the audio archive of the interview with Don, please click here. Sloan devoted a full two hours to the subject--to listen to the second hour, click here. Sloan said that he planned to ask the bill's co-sponsor, Senator Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), about SB 292 when Seitz appears on his show at 10 EST tomorrow (Tuesday). To listen to Seitz and Sloan live tomorrow, click here. To participate in F & F of Ohio's campaign against the bill, please click here.

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October 19, 2010

Donald Hubin, Ph.D., Chairman of Fathers and Families of Ohio's Executive Committee, appeared on the Scott Sloan Show on WLW AM 700 in Cincinnati on Monday to discuss SB 292, a new Ohio bill that will raise child support. The next day Sloan had the bill's co-sponsor, Senator Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), on his show and asked him in detail about SB 292. Hubin has written a response to some of Seitz's comments in defense of SB 292. He says:
Senator Seitz seems to think that if the numbers in the basic child support schedule is in dollar amounts rather than percentages, then the table doesn't respond to inflationary pressures.  However: 1) The tax tables are in dollar amounts.  Certainly nobody thinks that a person earning x dollars in 2010 should pay the inflation-adjusted amount of income tax that a person earning x dollars in 1992 would pay. This is similar. 2) General inflationary effects are handled by the child support tables because as people's income goes up due to inflationary pressures, they get into a higher income bracket and, so, pay more in child support. 3) This is why there is a huge difference between a "hard coded" dollar amount for a poverty level etc. and a "hard coded" (dollar amount) in a table that links payments to incomes. On the radio I said that the general inflationary effects are handled by the above mechanism–people moving to a higher income bracket as the value of money declines. It is true that some inflationary effects on child support remain, but they are relatively minor. They arise because lower income people spend a greater percentage of their income on their children than do higher income people.  Therefore, the effect of inflation is to lower the percentage of income that people are assumed to pay at a given level of real (inflation adjusted) income. If the increase in the tables were just based on the rate of inflation itself, then they would have to go up much more than SB 292 recommends.  The fact that no one is recommending this is an admission that the reasoning that Seitz and others is using is flawed. Only part of the proposed increase in the tables is attributable to the inflationary effect I mentioned above (#2).  The rest of the increase results from the change in methodology used.
To participate in F & F of Ohio's campaign against the bill, please click here. To listen to the audio archive of the interview with Don, please click here. Sloan devoted a full two hours to the subject--to listen to the second hour, click here. To listen to the audio archive of the interview with Senator Seitz, please click here and click on "Scott Sloan 10/19/10 Hour 2."

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December 20, 2010

hubin-quoted-12-20-10Donald Hubin, Ph.D., Chairman of Fathers and Families of Ohio"s Executive Committee, was quoted in 10 Ohio newspapers over the weekend concerning men's fear of divorce and the family court system. Reporter Jessica Alaimo of the Media Network of Central Ohio wrote:
One observer points to a cause of the trepidation on men's part: The change in their pocket just isn't enough. "Lower-income males are not very marriageable," said Donald Hubin, executive director of Fathers and Families Ohio, a group dedicated to family court reform. Hubin said men are marriage-shy. "People say, 'What's the point of getting married when it will end in divorce?'" he said. Hubin said men have concerns about obligations family courts will impose on them. The organization recently lobbied against a bill that would have raised child support obligations.
To read the full article, see the Media Network of Central Ohio's In Ohio, single men outnumber single women (12/20/10).

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Fathers and Families Executive Director Glenn Sacks appeared on the Dr. Helen Show on PJTV alongside radio host Tony Katz and media commentator Alfonzo Rachel on Wednesday, March 16. The subject of the show was Kay Hymowitz's controversial new book Manning Up: How the Rise of Women Has Turned Men into Boys. To watch the show, click here.

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