NPO news RELEASES

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NATIONAL PARENTS ORGANIZATION

PRESS RELEASE

SHARED PARENTING BENEFITS WOMEN AFTER DIVORCE 

MORE EQUALIZED APPROACH TO PARENTING CAN HELP CLOSE PAY GAP

October 24, 2016

Women’s equality has received significant attention from both candidates in this election cycle. One possible solution to the persistent problem of wage and workplace inequality has not been mentioned. National Parents Organization encourages family courts throughout the nation to support women's equality efforts by embracing shared parenting. 

An increasing amount of research shows that shared parenting, or 50/50 custody, is most beneficial to children’s health and wellbeing in instances of divorce or separation, when both parents are fit. Shared parenting is equally advantageous to mothers and women’s equality. In addition to happier, healthier children, one key benefit is that shared parenting allows moms to pursue careers and narrow the “pay gap.” 

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NATIONAL PARENTS ORGANIZATION
PRESS RELEASE

 CHILD SUPPORT PANEL TO DISCUSS MAJOR PROBLEMS WITH VIRGINIA GUIDELINES 

 October 3, 2016

On Wednesday, Oct. 5, the Virginia Child Support Guidelines Review Panel will be discussing two big problems with the state's child support guidelines: the 90-day "cliff" between sole custody and shared custody calculation, and the 1.4 "multiplier" applied to those divorced couples who choose to have shared custody of their kids. 

The vast majority of parents (especially those in low-income brackets) are unaware of the "90-day cliff," which can ultimately result in as much as a 60 to 70 percent difference in monthly child support owed, just for a few days' difference in visitation. Instead of addressing the root cause of this "cliff," Virginia lawmakers created an additional policy that charges parents who agree to share custody of their children an additional 40 percent of child support.  

"This 'cliff' and the 40 percent multiplier drive additional litigation, legal expenses, and stress for Virginian families, who are already stretched to the limit as it is," said Christian Paasch, a member of National Parents Organization of Virginia who was appointed to the state's Child Support Guidelines Review Panel by Gov. McAuliffe. "Instead, we believe families should be able to spend their energy on their children and rebuilding their own lives. Ultimately, both of these policies are unnecessary and overly burdensome, when much simpler, less stressful, and more effective options are available."

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NATIONAL PARENTS ORGANIZATION
PRESS RELEASE

NEVADA MOVES TOWARD SHARED PARENTING WITH NEW LAW

 COMMONSENSE SOLUTION FOR PARENTS AND CHILDREN GAINING NATIONAL MOMENTUM

 September 26, 2016

Nevada has moved from being among the worst states for shared parenting laws to being in the top third. Shared parenting is a flexible arrangement where children spend as close to equal time with each parent as possible after divorce or separation if both parents are fit. It has been shown to be highly beneficial to most children. The changes in the Nevada custody law were brought about by Nevada’s Parental Rights Protection Act of 2015.

According to attorney Keith Pickard, who was the principal architect of the bill, Nevada statutes now establish a presumption of joint legal custody and a preference for joint physical custody, when the parents agree to it. Nevada now has uniform rules against relocating children anywhere that “would substantially impair the ability of the other parent to maintain a meaningful relationship with the child.” And the rules for relocating when parents have shared physical custody are designed to protect both parents’ relationships with the children.

“With the new law in place, Nevada is on its way to giving children what they most want and need after the trauma of parental separation or divorce: the continued love and guidance of both parents,” says Ned Holstein, MD, National Parents Organization founder.

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NATIONAL PARENTS ORGANIZATION
PRESS RELEASE

NEW YORK COURTS RULE IN FAVOR OF PARENTAL RIGHTS FOR SAME-SEX PARENTS  

 DECISION BENEFITS PARENTS AND CHILDREN BUT CELEBRATION IS PREMATURE

September 26, 2016

The New York State Court of Appeals recently ruled that an unmarried woman who had helped raise a child with her same-sex partner was entitled to seek parenting time in family court after the couple broke up. The woman was not a biological parent of the child. A New York Times editorial hailed this decision as an overdue and rightful expansion of the parenting rights of people in same-sex relationships.

The court based its decision in part on research that “reveals the trauma children suffer as a result of separation from a primary attachment figure -- such as a de facto parent -- regardless of that figure’s biological or adoptive ties to the children.” National Parents Organization agrees wholeheartedly with the Court’s recognition of the trauma children suffer when they are forcibly separated from established parental figures.

However, celebration is premature. The decision merely grants non-biological same-sex parents the right to a custody battle, like heterosexual couples. As with hetero cases, it does not establish that children will actually be granted the continuing love and guidance of both beloved parents. It will be of little value to children if, as with heterosexual couples, one parent is relegated to the role of a “visitor,” seeing the child only every other weekend or so.

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NATIONAL PARENTS ORGANIZATION
PRESS RELEASE

DIVORCE CAN LEAVE PARENTS WITH A PREMATURE EMPTY NEST

SHARED PARENTING OFFERS A COMMONSENSE SOLUTION FOR PARENTS AND CHILDREN

September 14, 2016

As the school year begins, many parents of college-age kids are watching their children leave home for the first time. For many parents, this exciting occasion can also be tinged with sadness.Known as empty nest syndrome, this experience is often characterized by depression and anxiety for parents. Nevertheless, grown children leaving home is a normal human transition and one to which most parents eventually adjust.

But what happens when children are removed from their parents’ homes too soon, before either parent or child is ready – when the child is 7 instead of 17? This is the sad reality for many parents following a divorce.

“Due to antiquated sole custody laws, the parent who ‘loses’ the custody battle can experience a premature empty nest, thrust into the unfortunate role of ‘visitor’ in their children’s lives,” says Ned Holstein, MD, founder of National Parents Organization. “In these cases, the feelings of loneliness, heartache, and grief that can accompany a child leaving home are often amplified.”

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