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A Distant Mirror: Israeli Family Law Mirrors that of the U.S.

August 5, 2015 by Robert Franklin, Esq, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

On its face, this article describes little more than the usual sort of injustice meted out daily in family courts (Israeli National News, 8/3/15). The differences between it and countless others are that (a) the case occurs in Israel and (b) oddly enough, it casts light on the history of child support law in this country.

 

Now It’s Anne-Marie Slaughter’s Turn to Get it Wrong on the Work/Family Balance

August 3, 2015 by Robert Franklin, Esq, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Maybe it’s something in the water. What else can explain the sudden bloom of articles about work/family balance? Whatever the case, Anne-Marie Slaughter makes it three in a row here (Dallas Morning News, 7/31/15). She seems to have made an honest effort at sorting out the issues that confront men and women faced with deciding who works for a living, how much, who cares for the kids and how much. Or has she?

 

Juvenile Court Secrecy Hides Negligence of Child Welfare Officials

August 2, 2015 by Robert Franklin, Esq, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Tennessee courts and laws are shielding the activities of child welfare workers from public view in a case that fairly screams ‘negligence’ on their part. We see this regularly of course and I’ve commented on it many times. Almost invariably, what child welfare authorities do or don’t do in individual cases remains unknown to the press and the public due to laws requiring confidentiality. But in this case as in so many others, what’s being protected is the malfeasance of CPS workers and others, not the best interests of children (Memphis Commercial Appeal, 7/31/15).

 

More Disinformation on the Work/Family Balance, Courtesy of the New York Times

July 31, 2015 by Robert Franklin, Esq, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Like a bad penny...

No sooner had I reported on a terrible article about at bad study of Australian men and women and their attitudes toward work and family than this article turns up about the same subject, but based on different studies (New York Times, 7/30/15). Fortunately, the Times piece is better than the one on Yahoo I posted about yesterday, but that’s not setting the bar any too high. Like the Yahoo article, Claire Cain Miller’s one in the Times fails to grasp the most basic ideas about how people solve the work/family conundrum.

 

Pass Massachusetts S.B. 834!

July 30, 2015
By Robert Franklin, Esq, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

National Parents Organization had a huge win this year in Utah. The Beehive State passed the most far-reaching shared parenting bill ever in the United States save possibly for Arizona’s. That law encourages judges to order a minimum of 145 days parenting time — 40% — for each parent post-divorce.


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