Ending Permanent Alimony

New Hampshire Introduces Shared Parenting, Alimony Reform, and Rules of Evidence

“The Boys at the Back”


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Ending Permanent Alimony

New Hampshire Introduces Shared Parenting, Alimony Reform, and Rules of Evidence

“The Boys at the Back”
February 7, 2013
Top Story
Ending Permanent Alimony
By Rita Fuerst Adams, National Executive Director,
Fathers and Families


Rita Fuerst Adams
Rita Fuerst Adams
An end to permanent alimony certainly appears more plausible when it makes headlines in the Personal Finance section of U.S. News: Money. Geoff Williams, who has authored several articles about the finances of divorce, addresses how this is a holdover from a time when women were taken care of by their husbands.

In “Taking the ‘Permanent’ Out of Permanent Alimony” he states, “Permanent alimony was created in the days when women didn't go to college and rarely had careers, instead tending to the kids and household. Then it was sorely needed. Now, opponents argue, those reasons for its being are long past.”

“Even opponents of permanent alimony agree that there are sometimes good reasons for a spouse to receive permanent alimony (e.g., they have a disability preventing them from working). In other cases, however, when the recipient is healthy and college-educated, it can seem as if fate has smiled upon one person, who now has something akin to lottery winnings for life, and scorned the other as an unlucky soul who now must pay for the mistake of marrying the wrong person for the rest of their life.”

While Massachusetts took the step to end the practice of permanent alimony, it is still going strong in New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, Connecticut, North Carolina, West Virginia, and Florida.

Fathers and Families is getting started in Connecticut. If you wish to join in, please email me.



New Hampshire Introduces Shared Parenting, Alimony Reform, and Rules of Evidence
By Rita Fuerst Adams, National Executive Director,
Fathers and Families


Jeffrey Oligny
Jeffrey Oligny
Fathers and Families member Jeffrey Oligny, R-Rockingham 34, introduced shared parenting legislation in this session in New Hampshire.

In the proposed legislation, HB578, Representative Jeffrey Oligny seeks: “The court shall issue an order that provides for frequent and continuing contact between each parent and the minor child or children and for the sharing of responsibilities of child-rearing and encouraging the love, affection, and contact between the minor child or children and the parents, regardless of marital status, unless the court makes an explicit finding that such contact is not in the best interest of the child. There shall be a rebuttable presumption that joint parental rights and responsibilities and approximately equal parenting time are in the best interest of the child or children.”

In addition to shared parenting legislation, Representative Oligny worked with these legislators to introduce two other family law bills: Patrick F. Abrami (R-Rockingham 19); Brian Chirichiello (R-Rockingham 6); George Lambert (R-Hillsborough 44); Michele Peckham (R-Rockingham 22); and Stella Tremblay (R-Rockingham 4).

HB605: Requiring the Supreme Court to adopt rules of evidence for the judicial branch family division, and to the extent practicable, shall be based on the New Hampshire rules of evidence for other courts in the state.

HB604: The bill provides an award of alimony shall be based, in part, on clear and convincing evidence that the party is unable to be self-supporting through appropriate employment. The bill also requires a party to request a renewal of alimony within 5 years of the divorce decree.

Please let these legislators know you appreciate the work they are doing to improve the lives of our children by encouraging family courts to preserve the bond between both parents and their children. Each of their names link to their email.



“The Boys at the Back”
By Rita Fuerst Adams, National Executive Director,
Fathers and Families


Christina Hoff Sommers
Christina Hoff Sommers
Post your comments to the article, “The Boys at the Back”, in the Sunday Review of the New York Times, from Sunday, February 3rd.

Let the author, Christina Hoff Sommers, know that you agree with her analysis of the study on how boys are treated in school. Make the point that this again shows the need for fathers to be involved in their children’s education, especially their sons’ education.

The Journal of Human Resources is publishing the study of 5,800 students from kindergarten through fifth grade and found that boys across all racial groups and in all major subject areas received lower grades than their test scores would have predicted. Boys score as well as or better than girls on most standardized tests, yet they are far less likely to get good grades, take advanced classes, or attend college. Teachers of classes as early as kindergarten factor good behavior into grades – and girls, as a rule, comport themselves far better than boys.

Christina Hoff Sommers is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and the author of The War Against Boys. Her article is part of a New York Times series, The Great Divide, on inequality – the haves, the have-nots, and everyone in between. It is covering such issues in the United States and around the world and the implications for economics, politics, society, and culture.
In the News
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New York: Hands-On Dad Jonathan Sporn Fights for Parental Rights

New Mexico: Andrew Valdez Sues Sheriff for Failing to Protect Son from Abusive Mother

Huffington Post: Fathers at Fault for Single Motherhood

Seth Ireland’s Father Sues Fresno County for Son’s Death

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Fathers and Families Now Ready for Gifts of Securities
Members have contacted Fathers and Families asking how to make gifts directly from their brokerage accounts. If you wish to make your end of the year gift with securities, you may use this form to transfer securities directly to Fathers and Families brokerage account, or you may contact Rita for assistance at 617.542.9300 ext. 3, or email.



Fathers and Families is a Shared Parenting Organization
Fathers and Families is a non-profit organization that is educating the public, families, educators, and legislators about the importance of shared parenting and how it can reduce conflict in children, parents and extended families. If you would like to get involved in our organization, you can do so several ways. First, we would love to have you as an official member of the Fathers and Families team. Second, Fathers and Families is an organization that believes in the importance of using social media as a means to spread the word about shared parenting and other topics, and you can visit us on our Facebook Page to learn more about our efforts. Last, we hope you will share this newsletter with other families using the many social networking sites so that we can bring about greater awareness of shared parenting. Thank you for your support.



Mission
Fathers and Families improves the lives of children and strengthens society by protecting the child’s right to the love and care of both parents after separation or divorce. We seek better lives for children through family court reform that establishes equal rights and responsibilities for fathers and mothers.



Fathers and Families
Fathers and Families
PO Box 270760
Boston, Massachusetts 02127-0760
(617) 542-9300
www.fathersandfamilies.org
[email protected]

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Volunteer Testimonial

"I am honored to be a part of the National Parents Organization and to support the effort to make shared parenting the presumptive model for divorced families. Social justice comes in many forms, not the least of which is ensuring a child’s right to receive equitable love, care and role modeling from both parents whenever those parents are willing and able to make that commitment. As a child victim of a winner-take-all physical custody system myself, I know how impractical it is to have a healthy, nurturing relationship with the parent whom one merely “visits.” "

By Don Neel, Member, Connecticut Executive Committee