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NPO publishes blog articles to inform and to stimulate conversation about issues of importance to NPO's mission.  All blog articles express the opinions of the authors as individuals and do not necessarily reflect the views of National Parents Organization, its Board of Directors, or its executives.  

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May 31, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

JP Morgan Chase and Company has agreed to pay $5 million to settle a sex discrimination suit filed by a father who was denied parental leave (MSN, 5/30/19).
The payout resolves a 2017 complaint brought by the American Civil Liberties Union alleging bias against Derek Rotondo, who had applied unsuccessfully for the 16-week parental leave benefit available to employees who are the “primary caregiver” of a new kid.
Unsurprisingly, Rotondo was considered by the company to not be his child’s primary caregiver. 
In the complaint filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Rotondo said the company told him it started from the presumption that a child’s birth mother was the primary caregiver. And because his wife, a teacher, wasn’t incapacitated and had the summer off, he couldn’t qualify.
Given that most primary caregivers to children are mothers, the company’s policy seems to have blatantly discriminated against fathers and in favor of mothers.  Indeed, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled accordingly.

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May 30, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Just three years after his appointment, Hank Whitman is stepping down as Texas’ Commissioner of the Department of Family and Protective Services (Texas Tribune, 5/28/19).  The DFPS oversees Child Protective Services in the state.

Whitman’s appointment raised eyebrows back in April of 2016 because the man has a law-enforcement background with the Texas Rangers.  What that had to do with children’s welfare, the foster care system, cases-to-caseworkers ratios, etc. few people could figure out, myself included.  Still, on the face of it at least, Whitman’s done what was needed.  My guess is that he’s happy to be returning to law enforcement, but today, three years later, CPS is in much better shape than it was when he arrived.

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May 28, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

We say that we want children to have financial support.  They need it, after all, and if an adult makes the decision to bring a child into the world, he/she should be obliged to provide what’s necessary to give it a full, healthy life.  When parents divorce, neither of them magically loses that obligation. 

Fair enough.

But if we do want children to be supported financially, why do we make it so hard on non-custodial parents to do so?  Why don’t we, for example, order equal parenting in the great majority of divorce and custody cases?  That would mean each parent could simply bear the costs of caring for the child when little Andy or Jenny is with them, plus half of the non-everyday expenses.  In short, most child support orders would simply become moot and a huge area of conflict between parents would vanish.

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May 27, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

In his paper written for publication in a hard-copy book to be published by the Oxford University Press in October, William Fabricius goes on to other considerations that militate in favor of a presumption of equal parenting to be written into family law.

He points out that, whatever our culture may have favored 50 years ago, it now supports children having as much time as possible with each parent following divorce.  In that, We the People once again demonstrate ourselves to be smarter and more humane than elites who govern- and not occasionally decide what’s good for - us.  I of course have reported many times on the increasing number and variety of surveys demonstrating popular support for equal parenting.

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This continues from yesterday my discussion of Dr. William Fabricius’ paper “Equal Parenting Time: The Case for a Legal Presumption,” that will be published in hard copy in October of this year in the Oxford Handbook of Children and the Law, edited by J.G. Dwyer and published by Oxford University Press.

Is there a causal effect of equal parenting on increased child well-being or are the 60+ studies finding better outcomes for children with equal parenting merely correlational?  Dr. Fabricius finds that equal parenting tends to cause those improved outcomes.

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May 24, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization
As Joan Kelly has pointed out, the current child custody statutes were written in the absence of evidence of how well they promoted children’s well-being. The evidence that is now available is compelling that failure to enact presumptions of equal parenting time risks unnecessary harm to children’s emotional security with their parents, and consequently unnecessary harm to public health in the form of long-term stress-related mental and physical health problems among children of divorce.
That’s how Dr. William Fabricius closes his latest paper on the science underpinning equal parenting and children’s well-being.  It’s about as succinct and powerful an endorsement of equal parenting as I’ve ever seen.  It captures the historical context of present-day law, i.e. laws on child custody were written by lawmakers who had no access to scientific evidence about how the laws they passed might influence the very people they were supposedly designed to serve – children.

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May 18, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Texas Child Protective Services has dropped its appeal of a $127,000 sanctions case against it (Houston Chronicle, 5/16/19).  I first wrote about the case here.

Last July, little Mason Bright, then five months old, fell forward and hit his head on the driveway.  His mother, Melissa, took him to Texas Children’s Hospital where doctors found two skull fractures and what seemed abnormal bleeding on his brain.  That spurred a “child abuse pediatrician” to say that abuse of Mason must have been the cause.  Later, better-informed medical opinions said that Mason had a rare clotting disorder that could explain the bleeding and that it’s not unusual for such a fall to cause more than one fracture.

But CPS had already acted.  They took Mason from his parents, Melissa and Dillon Bright, and placed him 40 miles away with a relative.  That arrangement didn’t work out and soon Mason was back with his parents.  The Brights had understood that his placement with the relative was temporary, so, when a caseworker contacted them to ask how the little boy was, they happily responded with updated medical information and happy-child photos.

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May 17, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

The same article I wrote about yesterday goes on from Scott Vogel’s story about spending $130,000 and three years of his life trying to get more than about 14% parenting time with his son and daughter (KARE11, 5/14/19).  It discusses a bill before the legislature that would establish a presumption of equal parenting.
State Representative Peggy Scott, R-Andover, is leading an effort to change the law.
She and a long list of supporters feel it’s time for the law to catch up with culture.
“It's a winner and a loser,” said Scott. “It's a contest to see who can be a better parent in the eyes of the court. And that's not fair to the kid.”
Yes, the idea that there has to be a “winner” parent and a “loser” parent has always meant that, whichever parent comes out on top, little Andy or Jenny is the loser.  Going from seeing Dad every day and forming an attachment to him to seeing him only four days per month is a trauma for kids.  I hope we’ll someday look back on that routine practice of family courts and call it ‘child abuse,’ because that’s what it is.  It’s injurious to children.  That we have so much science demonstrating the fact and yet still marginalize dads in their children’s lives is not defensible, absent unfitness or abuse by the marginalized parent.

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May 16, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Here’s a balanced and informative article on the push for shared parenting in Minnesota (KARE11, 5/14/19).  NPO’s good friend, the redoubtable Molly Olson has been battling the state legislature on behalf of shared parenting for well over a decade now, so it’s good to see her getting a bit of a boost from the press.

The article starts with Scott Vogel and his donnybrook in family court.
Unable to agree on a schedule for the kids, Vogel took their case to court where he has spent three years and more than $150,000 hoping a judge will award him equal parenting time.

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May 15, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

The recent Nebraska case of Dowding v. Dowding gives us a good opportunity to take a second look at our fairly invariable support for equal parenting.  This blog has always recognized that there are plenty of instances in which equal - or even shared – parenting either cannot work or isn’t in a child’s interests.  Serious child abuse is one example, parental unfitness is another and significant geographic separation of the parents is another.  None of those is present in Dowding and yet the court’s decision to grant primary custody to the father isn’t clearly wrong.  Neither is it clearly right.

Timothy and Cameo Dowding were married for about three years, but had an ongoing relationship well before that.  They had a son, Treton, in 2010, but separated in 2016.  Because they weren’t married at the time Treton was born, they both signed an Acknowledgement of Paternity to establish Timothy as his father.

So it was altogether strange that, when their divorce pleadings were filed, Cameo alleged that Timothy wasn’t Treton’s dad and demanded genetic testing.  The court refused the request because, under Nebraska law and the circumstances of the case, the only way to rescind an Acknowledgement of Paternity is to produce evidence that it was brought about by “fraud, duress or material mistake of fact.”

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National Parents Organization wishes our readers and supporters a happy Mother's Day. 

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May 7, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

The Alabama Senate has overwhelmingly passed a strong shared parenting bill.  SB 266 passed the Senate by a vote of 25 – 4 and now goes on to the House for consideration.

Senator Larry Stutts is the lead sponsor of SB 266.  He had this to say about it and shared parenting:
“Parental equality should be the starting point for every child custody case,” Stutts remarked. “Ultimately, it’s about the child having a right to equal time with both of his or her mother, father, and extended family, provided that both parents are responsible adults.”

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May 6, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Read this (The Fatherless Generation).  It’s a good compendium of many of the social, behavioral, emotional, educational, etc. deficits kids experience correlated with fatherlessness.  It’s probably nothing you haven’t seen before, at least piecemeal, but there’s a lot here and it’s well worth brushing up on.

For at least a couple of decades, this type of information has been well known.  Way back in 1994 David Blankenhorn forced the world to confront the deep-rooted problems associated with fatherlessness.  Barbara Dafoe Whitehead did much the same in her 1993 article in The Atlantic Monthly entitled “Dan Quayle Was Right.”  We should have gotten to work then fixing the problem of fatherlessness.  Instead, we did the opposite.  We ignored the problem and vilified fathers and men generally for every imaginable slight and error, whether real or not.  We still do.

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May 4, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Now it’s Virginia’s turn to fail its abused and neglected kids in foster care (Virginia Mercury, 12/11/18).  It’s not a new article, but it reports on an old, old problem.

Back in December, the state legislature received a report done at the behest of the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Committee.  It was, according to two lawmakers, a “devastating report.”

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This article originally ran in the Kentucky Era

In the wake of last year’s legislative approval of a law on shared parenting, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin has proclaimed today Shared Parenting Day.

The proclamation reflects the need for parents to share equally in parenting their children during times of divorce or separation and Kentucky’s role in highlighting the issue.

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May 2, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

It’s another case in which the law makes something hard out of something easy (Indiana Lawyer, 4/30/19).

Jessica Boyd and Jason Baugh weren’t married and had an off-again/on-again relationship.  During that time, Boyd gave birth to two children, both of whom Baugh acknowledged by affidavit to be his.  That constituted proof of paternity under Indiana law, so, when the two adults split up in 2010, the court ordered joint custody for Boyd and Baugh.

For unknown reasons, in 2017, Boyd asked Michael Litton to take a paternity test regarding the younger child.  She and Litton had had an affair during one of her breaks from Baugh.  Sure enough, DNA testing revealed Litton to have fathered the younger of the two children.

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May 1, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Why the retreat from marriage?  Marriage rates have been declining for years in this country, but exactly why they have remains unclear.  That’s because, while overall marriage rates are down, more affluent Americans tend to get and remain married.  Indeed, non-marital childbearing among women with a college education is about 8%, i.e. almost exactly what it was in 1960.  The decline in marriage is pretty much confined to blue collar workers and the poor.

And that’s a brain teaser.  Why would the very people who financially need marriage the most be the ones who tend to forego it?  Married men, particularly those with children earn significantly more than their unmarried and/or childless counterparts.  And in any case, the simple fact is that almost any adult can earn more than the incremental cost of his/her presence in the household.  Mom and baby require X amount to meet their expenses; add Dad and the household requires more money, but the increased amount is something all but the most dysfunctional adults can easily earn.  Two earners are better than one in almost all cases.

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April 29, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

At the urging of NPO’s Matt Hale, Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin established April 26th as Shared Parenting Day.  He issued a proclamation saying so, but went a step further saying this:
“In recognition of the passage of HB 528 into law last year, I am designating April 26, 2019, as Shared Parenting Day in Kentucky.  Kentucky’s children are the Commonwealth’s most important asset, and shared parenting benefits our children by providing access to both parents following a divorce or separation, while also factoring in clearly defined exceptions.”
Indeed.  Children are not only our most important asset, but they’re our future.  Every child is the future of our society, our culture, our body politic.  Their well-being is the very core of what we’ve built.  The separation of children from their parents is a wrong that has no justification and certainly not in their “best interests.”

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April 27, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

It’s sometimes amusing to watch the mainstream press grapple with family court issues.  Often enough, the MSM simply gets facts wrong.  This article doesn’t do that and it definitely tries to inform about the gravity of the situation in child custody matters (KFOXTV, 4/24/19).  Unfortunately though it reads like it was written by a reporter with too many facts and too little time to sort out what they all mean.

Still, the piece contains some valuable gems.

It’s raison d’etre is that Thursday was Parental Alienation Day.  That in itself is good news since dedicating a day to PA goes at least some way toward undercutting the notion, advanced by some, that PA either doesn’t exist at all or is merely a clever ruse on the part of fathers to deny “protective” mothers sole custody of children.

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April 26, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

It was one year ago today that the Kentucky Legislature passed, by an overwhelming margin, the nation’s first equal parenting bill.  Governor Matt Bevin wasted no time in signing it into law.  Now Gov. Bevin has taken shared parenting one step further.  He’s named April 26th Shared Parenting Day.  From here on out, we’ll commemorate the importance of equal parenting on April 26th.

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Governor Bevin’s office awards NPO’s Matt Hale with nation’s first Shared Parenting Day Proclamation. Shared Parenting Day will be April 26 in Kentucky!

Shared parenting day

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April 25, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization
The 49-year-old helicopter pilot choked up, recalling the tightness in his chest, the shortness of breath, the panic that gripped him Oct. 20, 2016, when his son was abducted from the family home in Langley.
That pilot is Demetri Urella of British Columbia.  Did mysterious, black-clad strangers enter his home and make off with his child?  Did they break down the door, grab the screaming two-year-old and run for a battered but running van parked on the curb?

No, nothing so Hollywood-inspired.  The abductors were the little boy’s mother, aided and abetted by a judge and a system that makes child abduction – the denial to a child of a parent’s love – all too easy (Vancouver Sun, 4/7/19). 

Urella’s (now ex-) wife, Beatriz Dominguez-Herrero, did what anyone can do.  She went to a judge, claimed that Urella was abusive and, without a scintilla of evidence to back up the claim, was handed not only sole custody of Julian, but a restraining order against Urella.  He wasn’t even there in court to defend himself, his presence being considered unnecessary due to the “special nature” of domestic violence allegations that, for some reason, are allowed to circumvent the most basic of due process rights.

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April 24, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Just 1% of British parents who were eligible to take parental leave in 2018 did so (Huffington Post, 4/5/19).  That’s according to data from the Trades Union Congress (TUC).
A new study indicated that only 9,200 new parents took up the shared leave in 2018 – just 1% of those eligible to it.
If this were an election, parental leave lost – big.  People “voted with their feet” and either remained at work or weren’t there to begin with and therefore didn’t need leave to care for their newborn.

So, are British parents simply unconcerned with their kids, or is something else at work?

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April 22, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Dr. Michael Lamb is possibly the most knowledgeable person about the benefits to children of paternal involvement in their lives.  He is extremely highly respected by his peers.  So it’s always a pleasure and a learning experience to read his work.  Here’s a short article of his that expounds on the effects of father-child relationships and children’s well-being, both at the time and later in life (The Good Men Project, 4/21/19).

Put simply, close, active father-child attachment is associated with a host of benefits for kids.

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