Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Member of the Board of Directors and Chair of the NPO Ohio Chapter Don Hubin was interviewed by the Public News Service about the Ohio Parenting Time Report. One highlight: "Hubin said if child custody arrangements are handled properly, the negative effects of divorce or separation on children can be minimized. And the report noted that shared physical custody also is a best-case scenario when there is a lot of conflict between parents."

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Chair of the Kentucky Chapter of National Parents Organization Matt Hale has an op-ed in The Mountain Advocate in Kentucky on the success and popularity of Kentucky's first in the nation shared parenting law, signed into law by Governor Matt Bevin this year. 

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
The Mountain Advocate in Kentucky has an article on poll results following passage of Kentucky's first in the nation shared parenting law, which was signed into law by Governor Matt Bevin earlier this year. In a clear win for shared parening, 83% of respondents believe it is in the child's best interest to have as much time as possible with both fit parents after divorce. 

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Member of the National Board of Directors, Robert Franklin, wrote an op-ed in the Houston Chronicle  on the number of surveys and polls across the nation that have shown that Americans want shared parenting after divorce or separation and how those with a financial interest in the divorce industry have prevented shared parenting laws from being passed. 

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Christian Paasch of National Parents Organization of Virginia writes about how the growing uproar to children being separated at the border highlights that forced separation has long existed in our family courts.

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
House 3090, or the child-centered family law bill, changes the demeaning language of “custody” and “visitation” to terms such as shared residential responsibility and parenting time.

Find More

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
House Bill 528 received bipartisan support from Democrats and Republicans in Kentucky’s legislature. The House of Representatives passed it with an 81-2 vote, while the Senate gave unanimous approval. Gov. Matt Bevin signed it into law in late April. This historic piece of legislation will specifically benefit African-American families.

Find More

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
A sad consequence that is endured with alarming frequency by our nation’s military and first responder communities is to find that their service is often used against them during separation or divorce proceedings, resulting in the imposition of onerous parenting plans in family court.

Find More

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
A day like Father’s Day allows everyone to pause from their hectic lives, slow down and celebrate an incredible gift that we too often take for granted in our daily lives: family. This year in Virginia, thanks to our legislators and Governor, we have even more reason to celebrate. 

Find More

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
This Father’s Day, we have even more to celebrate than usual: Gov. Matt Bevin recently signed House Bill 528 into law, which will take effect later this month. It’s the first law of its kind to give a child of divorce/separation a presumption of joint custody and shared parenting time when both parents are fit caregivers.

Find More

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
According to RT America's broadcast, about half of all American marriages end in divorce with kids caught in the middle. But just how fair are the courts when it comes to custody battles? Holland discusses this with Dr. Ned Holstein, the founder and chairman of the National Parents Organization.

The full broadcast can be viewed here with Holstein appearing at the 14-minute mark.

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
More than one in four fathers in the United States who have children 18 or younger now lives apart from their children, according to Pew. 

A movement is growing toward shared parenting or at least collegial “co-parenting” that recognizes the importance of having two parents in children's lives. And in states like Virginia and Kentucky, legislation was recently passed to encourage joint custody.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Host Kristi Slaughter interviews National Parents Organization of Virginia's Christian Paasch on the shared parenting bill that will become law in Virginia.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Bretta Z. Lewis has seen her share of custody cases in 18 years as a family law attorney.

Some of her clients think the courts favor mothers over fathers. Some mothers think their chances of getting custody are slim because they don’t make enough money.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Further, Kentucky politicians’ pride for being the only shared parenting state probably will be very short-lived. Many states are considering strengthening their joint custody laws. In fact, Alabama and Iowa’s Senates have both already passed this year stronger shared parenting bills than Kentucky’s landmark law. Kentucky’s law excludes parents who are found unfit based on a “preponderance of evidence.” In other words, the court will not award a parent joint custody if it believes there is a 51 percent or greater chance the parent is unfit. The Alabama and Iowa (and soon many others I’m sure) bills award shared parenting unless the court believes the parent is unfit based on “clear and convincing evidence,” which is much higher.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
The Bluegrass state's law will help children nationwide in several ways. First, new shared parenting bills will be easier to pass elsewhere now that the precedent is set. Kentucky's law will also touch other states as military parents flow to and from the state.

Our country's military families serving at Fort Knox and Fort Campbell will be among the first to benefit. Interracial children will benefit too. "African Americans are more likely to be treated unfairly in family court. The new shared parenting law will give minority parents and children fairer legal outcomes," said Jason Griffith, the Kentucky National Parents Organization's Minority Outreach Director.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Mothers are a critical part of our American society and of families. Importantly though, as a society, we must recognize that women and men together are indispensable partners to our country’s most valuable treasure: our children. We need to celebrate our children’s parents — both of them — as often as possible.

Still, in this modern era, people are often surprised to learn just how often courts operate with 1950s assumptions and routinely favor one parent over the other in instances of divorce or separation. Astonishingly, sole custody is awarded to one parent about 83 percent of the time, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, thus creating a confrontational dynamic of winner and loser/visitor.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Sometimes we shared-parenting advocates get the bad rap of being anti-mother. That is so far from the truth.

I’m actually a mother and grandmother, my 94-year-old mother is still living, and I have a daughter who I want to be happy and healthy. Motherhood is a blessing to me, and I will readily admit that the challenges of work and nurturing children at home are hard to handle all the time. Of course, that’s the beauty of shared parenting, sharing those responsibilities.

I have met so many women in the Missouri movement toward shared parenting after divorce who are mothers, stepmothers, grandmothers and aunts. This movement couldn’t have had the success its had without women stepping up to the plate. This played a big part in passing into law a bill supportive of shared parenting in 2016, and this year, a proposal seeking to strengthen that law (HB 1667) passed the House and will be heard on the Senate floor any day now. 

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Those testifying repeatedly called this a “pro-family bill” that didn’t just help fathers or mothers but also the children.

“Research overwhelmingly supports this principle,” said Linda Reutzel. “Equal shared parenting is in the best thing for children…Common sense and research show that the worst thing you can do to a child experiencing the divorce of their parents is to take one of them away.”  

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
For decades, it was a woman’s job to raise kids and a man’s job to pay for them. Our family courts are still forcing those gender roles on people, even when they divorce or separate.

We still see courts making mothers the primary custodians over 80 percent of the time. It’s still a woman’s job to raise the kids, married or not. The same courts send fathers the bills. It’s still the man’s job to pay.

Things are quickly changing. A light of hope arose this week in a surprising place. On April 26, Gov. Matt Bevin signed a new child custody law (House Bill 528) that was initiated by the National Parents Organization. The bill passed both chambers of the state legislature overwhelmingly. Republicans and Democrats spoke with one voice, stating that children deserve the best chance in life, and that means equal access to both parents.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Kentucky is the first state in the country to create a “legal presumption” for joint custody in divorce proceedings.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
The state of Kansas’ new Child Support Evaders program functions as a “most wanted″ of those who are behind on their child support payments: the names and faces of parents deemed the worst offenders have their faces and names posted online, complete with the amount they owe, their last known location and contact information.

This is a solution for families, says Gov. Jeff Colyer. But look closer, and the opposite is true — this program hurts, not helps, Kansas families.

This is detrimental to children and parents for many reasons. 

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
The Foundation for Government Accountability (FGA) claims that we should adopt even more draconian policies to collect child support than we already do by passing the Farm Bill currently before Congress. The National Parents Organization strongly believes that parents should responsibly support their children. But “cracking down” on parents who are poor has a long history of hurting children more than helping them.

Child support policy among the poor does not work for several long-known reasons.

Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Find more

Share this post

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn