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May 4, 2009

I'm quoted on dads as primary caregivers in nationally-syndicated advice columnist Amy Alkon's new column Harried, with Children. Alkon, whose columns appear in 100 newspapers, begins with a letter from "Stay-Late-At-Work Dad," who writes:
Women complain about how hard it is being a stay-at-home mom. After getting divorced, I discovered I could clean the entire house in a few hours...Men work long hours to support their families, only to be told they aren't doing enough around the house. I think being a mom is important and value stay-at-home moms, but let's talk turkey about who really has the hard job, okay?
Alkon responds:

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July 3, 2009

I discussed the "He-cession" and Reihan Salam's controversial article The Death of Macho (Foreign Policy, 7/2/09) on KGO AM 810 in San Francisco Thursday. An interview with Salam which was used as a set-up for my interview talked a lot about "Macho Men" (even playing the Village People's "Macho Man" in the background.) Salam spoke of the male blue-collar workers displaced by the recession as if they're privileged males who finally (and deservedly) have been knocked down a peg or two by the economic crisis. In his article, Salam wrote:
[In recent years male-dominated governments] acted to artificially prop up macho. One such example is the housing bubble...in the United States, the booming construction sector generated relatively high-paying jobs for the relatively less-skilled men who made up 97.5 percent of its workforce--$814 a week on average. By contrast, female-dominated jobs in healthcare support pay $510 a week, while retail jobs pay about $690 weekly. The housing bubble created nearly 3 million more jobs in residential construction than would have existed otherwise... These handsome construction wages allowed men to maintain an economic edge over women...subsidizing macho had all kinds of benefits, and to puncture the housing bubble would have been political suicide.

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February 10, 2010

I discussed the Mullen-Hobbs lesbian custody battle on the Bill Cunningham Show on 700 WLW in Cincinnati--to listen to the audio, click here. To learn more about the case, see the Cincinnati Enquirer's article here. To learn more about the gay divorce issue, see our co-authored column MSN.com column With Gay Marriage Comes Gay Divorce: The Rise of Lesbian Custody Battles (10/15/09).

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December 20, 2010

huff-po-logoFathers and Families Executive Director Glenn Sacks is quoted in the recent Huffington Post piece If You Were More Religious, Would You Have Stayed Married? (12/17/10). Author Jill Brooke writes:
Many of my colleagues in the divorce business lament how too many throw in the towel too early. The pursuit of personal happiness at all costs has trumped the value of loyalty and commitment. "Religion is one of the few institutions in society which requires and emphasizes introspection," says Glenn Sacks, the National Executive Director of Fathers and Families. "Too many divorces are initiated haphazardly and unnecessarily. Some of these marriages--not all, but some--could be saved and revived if the parties were more honest with themselves about their own failings, fairer and more realistic in their expectations for their partners, and more deeply concerned about the negative effect divorce often has upon children. These values--honesty, humility, forgiveness, and concern for others--are common religious values."
Fathers and Families takes no position on religion in general nor on any religion in particular. However, we do believe that introspection, whether religious or nonreligious, is important for a successful marriage and family life.

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October 26, 2011

In Hey ladies, want a hit song? Bash a man!, Today show contributor Tony Sclafani discusses what he calls a modern music trend towards"pro-female, anti-male anthems."

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