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    50 States Review - Glaring Parental Inequality

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NPO Blog

Stats Canada Data Show Both Sexes Opting for Traditional Roles Where Possible

September 21, 2017 by Robert Franklin, Esq, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

I’ve written a fair amount about how, despite the hectoring of gender feminists for almost five decades now, men and women still tend to take on roles within male/female relationships that have a distinctly traditional tint to them. When little Andy or Jenny comes into the world, Mom tends to decrease her paid work to do childcare and Dad tends to up his hours to compensate. That goes some way to explain not only women’s lower earnings, but also their lower savings rates, slower advancement in the workplace, etc.

The data on that and a wide variety of studies bear out my conclusions. This analysis of similar information out of Canada and its statistical agency, Statistics Canada, shows much the same thing. Indeed, a simple review of many of the section headings tells the story.

 

Canada: Single Parenthood Brings Child Poverty

September 20, 2017 by Robert Franklin, Esq, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Canada’s statistics-gathering agency, imaginatively named Statistics Canada, released a lot of data last week and various commentators are beginning to, well, comment. Such is this article that gets a lot right (Financial Times, 9/19/17). Any piece that includes the following message can’t be all bad.

You want to raise your kid’s chances of being poor? Get divorced.

It should come as no surprise that, in Canada as throughout the English-speaking world, single-parenthood and poverty go hand in hand. That of course means kids of single parents are much more likely than kids in two-parent families to live in poverty. Among other things, it’s worth remembering that public policy, in a variety of ways, promotes exactly that. You read that right; public policy promotes divorce which promotes child poverty. No one in government will ever admit such a thing, but facts don’t lie.

 

Those Winter Sundays

BY ROBERT HAYDEN

Sundays too my father got up early 
and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold, 
then with cracked hands that ached 
from labor in the weekday weather made 
banked fires blaze. No one ever thanked him. 

I’d wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking. 
When the rooms were warm, he’d call, 
and slowly I would rise and dress, 
fearing the chronic angers of that house, 

Speaking indifferently to him, 
who had driven out the cold 
and polished my good shoes as well. 
What did I know, what did I know 
of love’s austere and lonely offices?

 

New Swedish Study Shows Shared Parenting the Best Arrangement Post-Divorce

September 18, 2017 by Robert Franklin, Esq, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Our good friend Malin Bergstrom of Sweden’s Karolinska Institute at Uppsala University is set to publish another study finding that children in shared parenting arrangements have better outcomes than those in sole or primary care and, from parents’ perspectives, kids’ outcomes in shared care are indistinguishable from those in intact families. Here’s a brief article on her new work (Daily Mail, 9/5/17).

Bergstrom’s study looked at “emotional symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity or inattention and peer-relationship problems.” It did so by dividing up almost 3700 children into those in sole parent homes, intact families and homes with shared parenting. Researchers then asked parents and teachers to fill out questionnaires on various behavioral issues of the kids.

 

Notkin, Part Two: A Problem That’s not a Problem, Solutions that Aren’t Solutions

September 17, 2017 by Robert Franklin, Esq, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Continuing with Melanie Notkin’s awful and misandric screed in the New York Post (New York Post, 5/13/17).  Having called men “perpetual adolescents,” she goes on to wonder why they, like women, are delaying marriage and having children. 

I suppose it’s too much to ask Notkin to think about why men might be doing that, why they say they place less emphasis on career than did their predecessors or why they’re more ambivalent about male-female relationships than are women.  Needless to say, as with all gender feminists, Notkin’s ideas about men and women include essentially nothing about men as human beings with genuine needs of their own.  No, for her, men are entirely judged by what they do or don’t do for women.


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